When Do We Set Our Clocks Back an Hour?

daylight savings

October 31, 2004 – 2:00 AM
October 30, 2005 – 2:00 AM
October 29, 2006 – 2:00 AM

Federal Law Changes the Date of Daylight Savings in the United States

March 11, 2007 – 2:00 AM
March 9. 2008 – 2:00 AM
March 8, 2009 – 2:00 AM
March 14, 2010 – 2:00 AM
March 13, 2011 – 2:00 AM

The Clocks Are Set Forward…

April 4, 2004 - 2:00 AM
April 3, 2005 - 2:00 AM
April 2, 2006 - 2:00 AM

Federal Law Changes the Date of Daylight Savings in the United States

March 11, 2007 - 2:00 AM
March 9. 2008 - 2:00 AM
March 8, 2009 - 2:00 AM
March 14, 2010 - 2:00 AM
March 13, 2011 - 2:00 AM

The dates above are established by a U.S. Federal Law. This law says that any location within the union can choose whether or not to observe Daylight Savings Time, however if they do choose to observe it, they must use the above dates.

Daylight savings time is not practiced in Hawaii, Arizona (except for the Navajo Nation) and the territories of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa. This is mostly due to climate concerns, in that those areas already receive an excess of sunlight radiation and do not need longer days.

History of Daylight Savings

Benjamin Franklin is often credited as being the first to propose daylight savings time in an anonymous letter published during his stay as an envoy in France. In this satire he proposed that Parisians should undertake various methods to conserve candles and fuel by undertaking methods such as taxing the use of shutters, rationing candles, and using loud cannon blasts to wake the populace at dawn. In this letter he suggests that getting the populace to wake up at dawn, and go to bed at sunset would be another effective method of saving on lighting fuel. This sentiment mirrored a quote he put from Poor Richard’s Almanac, “Early to Bed and Early to Rise, Makes Man Healthy, Wealthy and Wise”. Franklin never actually proposed changing time schedules seasonally, because during that time they did not keep accurate enough time measurements to make this a meaningful idea.

William Willett first developed the idea in 1905. An avid outdoorsman, he observed that many Londoners missed the best part of the day sleeping, just because of what their clocks told them. He proposed moving the clock ahead two hours in the summer, to maximize on the daylight. He unsuccessfully lobbied for this idea for the rest of the life.

It wasn’t until 1916, a year after his death, that Germany and its allies in World War I began to implement his innovation. Shortly after that Britain and her allies also adopted a similar timekeeping system. Russia waited until 1917 to implement it within its territories, and the United States didn’t adopt the system until 1918.

Since then the terms, and conditions of daylight savings time have been adjusted in a variety of ways throughout the world.

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